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Whiting Rigs Here’s My Recommendation

Last Updated on by Dave

Getfished Tip, Whiting Rigs Here’s My Recommendation

This post is a small part taken from our King George Whiting, How To Catch More Using The Best Rigs Getfished Article.

When it comes to Whiting rigs the PaternosterPaternoster Rig Paternoster Rig is probably the most common rig you’ll see most experienced fishos using for Whiting.

Just enough weight to hold it in place.  Allowing your bait – or lure – to dangle in front of feeding shoals of King George Whiting.

Learning how to tie your own whiting rigs is an important skill.  Tying a paternoster isn’t hard, but does require practice.  So in the interests of helping you to get started fast – I’m going to suggest you buy some pre-tied paternoster whiting rigs.

You’ll find they are professionally tied, so quite strong.  They use knots that help in avoiding tangles and they’re actually incredibly cheap to buy.

So cheap, in fact, I just buy them these days, only tying if I run out.  This is because they mostly come with a good choice of hook sizes for KG whiting – and a sinker and swivel already attached.

A quick caveat:

Generally, I use the Jarvis Walker pre-tied rigs.  There are others, including the excellent Black Magic range.  I find the Black Magic rigs to be a little too expensive at some outlets.

While unquestionably quality made it’s just to easy to cast, snag and lose your rig.   At around the $15, at some tackle shops, I think the, roughly $4 Jarvis Walker rigs to be much better value for money.

This is down to personal taste and experience.  You may have or develop a different view.  If so – that’s fantastic!  I’d love to hear all about it from you in the comment section.

Just tie one knot from your mainline to the rig and you’re ready to bait up and start casting.

The JW rigs don’t come with the skirts and beads – but there’s is nothing stopping you from adding those yourself, if you wish to do so.

I bulk buy these rigs.  That means I carry half a dozen in my tackle box, with a few different other kinds, like running etc as well.  

Basically so I can change to different species and conditions depending on where I’m going to be fishing.

Generally, I’ll carry rigs comprised of either a size 6 or size 4 hook.  I tend to lean towards the size 6 due to the shank length being about right for the soft plastic lures I use.

The sinker size is a 30g on these rigs.  This gives you enough weight for casting and holding the rig down in most conditions.

When it comes to Whiting rigs the PaternosterPaternoster Rig Paternoster Rig is probably the most common rig you’ll see most experienced fishos using for Whiting.

Just enough weight to hold it in place.  Allowing your bait – or lure – to dangle in front of feeding shoals of King George Whiting.

Learning how to tie your own whiting rigs is an important skill.  Tying a paternoster isn’t hard, but does require practice.  So in the interests of helping you to get started fast – I’m going to suggest you buy some pre-tied paternoster whiting rigs.

You’ll find they are professionally tied, so quite strong.  They use knots that help in avoiding tangles and they’re actually incredibly cheap to buy.

So cheap, in fact, I just buy them these days, only tying if I run out.  This is because they mostly come with a good choice of hook sizes for KG whiting – and a sinker and swivel already attached.

A quick caveat:

Generally, I use the Jarvis Walker pre-tied rigs.  There are others, including the excellent Black Magic range.  I find the Black Magic rigs to be a little too expensive at some outlets.

While unquestionably quality made it’s just to easy to cast, snag and lose your rig.   At around the $15, at some tackle shops, I think the, roughly $4 Jarvis Walker rigs to be much better value for money.

This is down to personal taste and experience.  You may have or develop a different view.  If so – that’s fantastic!  I’d love to hear all about it from you in the comment section.

Just tie one knot from your mainline to the rig and you’re ready to bait up and start casting.

The JW rigs don’t come with the skirts and beads – but there’s is nothing stopping you from adding those yourself, if you wish to do so.

I bulk buy these rigs.  That means I carry half a dozen in my tackle box, with a few different other kinds, like running etc as well.  

Basically so I can change to different species and conditions depending on where I’m going to be fishing.

Generally, I’ll carry rigs comprised of either a size 6 or size 4 hook.  I tend to lean towards the size 6 due to the shank length being about right for the soft plastic lures I use.

The sinker size is a 30g on these rigs.  This gives you enough weight for casting and holding the rig down in most conditions.


By Dave - from Getfished!

About

Dave spends most of his time split between fishing, working on Getfished and on boating and kayak fishing. After 30+ years as a programmer spending more time as a fisho has allowed him to grow his passion for the hobby. Running Getfished has meant Dave's been able to share some of the places he loves to fish at. As well as some of his favourite tackle and gear.