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Flathead Off Piers, Breakwaters & Rock Walls

Last Updated on by Dave

Getfished Tip, Flathead Off Piers, Breakwaters & Rock Walls

This post is a small part taken from our Flathead – How You Can Catch Them Getfished Article.

There are several ways of approaching Flathead Off Piers, Breakwaters, Rock Walls etc. Like all fishing, it’s important to first get the lay off the land, as it were.

I strongly recommend you use a tool like Google Maps satellite images for the location you intend to fish. Studying that will show you features in the water, off the pier, breakwater etc.

Flathead Off Piers Directly Off & Under The Pier

You are likely to find flathead directly off and under many piers. Unfortunately, they tend to be amongst the most cautious. Basically, they spend most of their life with sinkers plonking all around them from other people fishing. They are more likely to have been hooked before – and shy for this reason as well.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t give it a try. You can and many people do catch fish in close to the structure.

This method requires no real casting. Just let the line drop over the side. You will need to take care however that you don’t snag your line on any supports, posts, bolts and nuts – and even rocks and weed that’s often directly around the vicinity.

Casting Out Off The Pier

Often the deepest water can be found off the sides off a pier or structure. Deeper water, particularly during the day, can be more productive. This is because it offers more protection for many fish species. Particularly smaller bait-fish and crustaceans such as crabs and prawns.

A regular spinning rod of around 7 to 9 feet is often the most common choice. A larger surf rod, however, can get you out further to any reefs, sea-grasses or deeper holes. This is why exploring satellite imagery is such a good idea. You can plan your casting zone and your rod in advance.

I like to spin and cast bait out from a pier, rock wall etc. I also always use berleyBerley Berley and attractants. We will take a look at these vital tools below.

There are several ways of approaching Flathead Off Piers, Breakwaters, Rock Walls etc. Like all fishing, it’s important to first get the lay off the land, as it were.

I strongly recommend you use a tool like Google Maps satellite images for the location you intend to fish. Studying that will show you features in the water, off the pier, breakwater etc.

Flathead Off Piers Directly Off & Under The Pier

You are likely to find flathead directly off and under many piers. Unfortunately, they tend to be amongst the most cautious. Basically, they spend most of their life with sinkers plonking all around them from other people fishing. They are more likely to have been hooked before – and shy for this reason as well.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t give it a try. You can and many people do catch fish in close to the structure.

This method requires no real casting. Just let the line drop over the side. You will need to take care however that you don’t snag your line on any supports, posts, bolts and nuts – and even rocks and weed that’s often directly around the vicinity.

Casting Out Off The Pier

Often the deepest water can be found off the sides off a pier or structure. Deeper water, particularly during the day, can be more productive. This is because it offers more protection for many fish species. Particularly smaller bait-fish and crustaceans such as crabs and prawns.

A regular spinning rod of around 7 to 9 feet is often the most common choice. A larger surf rod, however, can get you out further to any reefs, sea-grasses or deeper holes. This is why exploring satellite imagery is such a good idea. You can plan your casting zone and your rod in advance.

I like to spin and cast bait out from a pier, rock wall etc. I also always use berleyBerley Berley and attractants. We will take a look at these vital tools below.


By Dave - from Getfished!

About

Dave spends most of his time split between fishing, working on Getfished and on boating and kayak fishing. After 30+ years as a programmer spending more time as a fisho has allowed him to grow his passion for the hobby. Running Getfished has meant Dave's been able to share some of the places he loves to fish at. As well as some of his favourite tackle and gear.