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Flathead Fishing Hints

Last Updated on by Dave

Getfished Tip, Flathead Fishing Hints

This post is a small part taken from our Flathead – How You Can Catch Them Getfished Article.

Before getting into flathead fishing hints dealing with how to catch them a word of warning about Australian flathead.

Just behind their gill plates, they have spines that carry a mild venom. It isn’t likely to kill you but it can hurt like crazy. Especially if it slices open or stabs an unwary hand or foot.

Their teeth are worth being cautious of too. So take care of handling them!

Finally – a quick word on conservation. Please obey the local size and/or bag limits of the state you are fishing in. They are there to help make sure the species continues to be there for the future.

There is some fisho’s who state that you should not take flathead specimens over 70cm because these are the females that will spawn. The intention is a good one, but the science, however, doesn’t back this up. Midsized females between 50 to 60cm reproduce. Females over 70cm are past reproduction – kind of like menopause.

Patience Is A Virtue In Flathead Fishing

In fishing, I pretty much adhere to the principle that patience is a virtue. This would have to be the most important of the flathead fishing hints here in my opinion.

If after a few casts you’re not getting bites you’ve got to ask yourself. Am I using the right bait or lure? Is my tackle right? Should it be on the seabed and running? PaternosterPaternoster Rig Paternoster Rig style? Floating? Bait kind? Am I using BerleyBerley Berley (chum) or just hoping a fish will swim by at the right moment?

Then there’s the location. Is it daytime and to shallow? Is there any structure for the fish to seek protection? Has there been a flush of freshwater from a nearby estuary after heavy rain?

We will take a look at environments for pier, beach and estuary a little further down.

Suffice to say, hard and fast rules are limits we place on ourselves, not the fish. Experimentation is key. I’ve caught flathead in a boat with a bare hook. Causing some of my friends to dub them “Kamikaze Fish.”

Carnivores – Sight, Vibration & Smell Are Important

The flathead is a carnivore. So they hunt by sight, vibration and smell. So experience shows the more you can appeal to each of these senses the better your chances of catching a flathead. This is why I use a variety of baits, lures, rigs, berley and attractants.

Also, as you learn more about flathead fishing, please keep in mind that you are better off targeting a single species. Trying to catch anything that swims by is more likely to leave you empty-handed at the end of the day.

This goes for any species. If it’s flathead you want – focus on tackle, lures and bait for flathead. Don’t try and catch flathead and hope to catch bream. Same goes for species like whiting. Focus on the flatties. If something else that’s good happens to take your offering – be happy with your good luck.

Before getting into flathead fishing hints dealing with how to catch them a word of warning about Australian flathead.

Just behind their gill plates, they have spines that carry a mild venom. It isn’t likely to kill you but it can hurt like crazy. Especially if it slices open or stabs an unwary hand or foot.

Their teeth are worth being cautious of too. So take care of handling them!

Finally – a quick word on conservation. Please obey the local size and/or bag limits of the state you are fishing in. They are there to help make sure the species continues to be there for the future.

There is some fisho’s who state that you should not take flathead specimens over 70cm because these are the females that will spawn. The intention is a good one, but the science, however, doesn’t back this up. Midsized females between 50 to 60cm reproduce. Females over 70cm are past reproduction – kind of like menopause.

Patience Is A Virtue In Flathead Fishing

In fishing, I pretty much adhere to the principle that patience is a virtue. This would have to be the most important of the flathead fishing hints here in my opinion.

If after a few casts you’re not getting bites you’ve got to ask yourself. Am I using the right bait or lure? Is my tackle right? Should it be on the seabed and running? PaternosterPaternoster Rig Paternoster Rig style? Floating? Bait kind? Am I using BerleyBerley Berley (chum) or just hoping a fish will swim by at the right moment?

Then there’s the location. Is it daytime and to shallow? Is there any structure for the fish to seek protection? Has there been a flush of freshwater from a nearby estuary after heavy rain?

We will take a look at environments for pier, beach and estuary a little further down.

Suffice to say, hard and fast rules are limits we place on ourselves, not the fish. Experimentation is key. I’ve caught flathead in a boat with a bare hook. Causing some of my friends to dub them “Kamikaze Fish.”

Carnivores – Sight, Vibration & Smell Are Important

The flathead is a carnivore. So they hunt by sight, vibration and smell. So experience shows the more you can appeal to each of these senses the better your chances of catching a flathead. This is why I use a variety of baits, lures, rigs, berley and attractants.

Also, as you learn more about flathead fishing, please keep in mind that you are better off targeting a single species. Trying to catch anything that swims by is more likely to leave you empty-handed at the end of the day.

This goes for any species. If it’s flathead you want – focus on tackle, lures and bait for flathead. Don’t try and catch flathead and hope to catch bream. Same goes for species like whiting. Focus on the flatties. If something else that’s good happens to take your offering – be happy with your good luck.


By Dave - from Getfished!

About

Dave spends most of his time split between fishing, working on Getfished and on boating and kayak fishing. After 30+ years as a programmer spending more time as a fisho has allowed him to grow his passion for the hobby. Running Getfished has meant Dave's been able to share some of the places he loves to fish at. As well as some of his favourite tackle and gear.