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Flathead Estuary Fishing

Last Updated on by Dave

Getfished Tip, Flathead Estuary Fishing

This post is a small part taken from our Flathead – How You Can Catch Them Getfished Article.

Unless you’re needing to cast incredible distances for some reason you can generally use estuary rods up to around 8 or 9-foot in length for flathead estuary fishing.

The usual flathead baits and lures work just as well here. Prawns, baitfish even sand or beach worms.

Good spots are often where the estuary has sandy beaches. Cast out into the channels and gutters. The turning tide is an excellent time to try.

Dusk & Dawn, Top Times

The larger flathead specimens are more likely to move in closer to shore after dusk and before dawn.

Berley and attractant is a must when flathead estuary fishing. See the next section where I explain some of the reasons I always use these tools. Suffice to say for now this is what gets the fish in closer to where you are and helps create some interest.

Because estuaries are such changeable environments there are times when flathead estuary fishing is going to be better – or worse.

For example, during and after a flood there’s often murkier and fresher water in the estuary. The tide is going to wash less salty water into the system. That can result in fewer flathead in the river. Naturally, this depends on the estuary. It seems to be a bigger problem in the southern states than northern states.

Flathead Estuary Fishing Environmental Considerations

You need to also consider the environment itself. Pollution levels from chemical spills. How clogged up the estuary gets. Weeds and more importantly silt can block the flow of the system. Because of this, some estuaries can remain landlocked for part of the year.

The Powlett river at Kilcunda is a good example of this. I’ve never caught a single flathead there. Though I’ve caught small Australian salmon. The Powlett estuary is frequently obstructed by a sandbar. When it does run it often does so over an exposed rock shelf that limits the amount of tidal water that enters the area.

Unless you’re needing to cast incredible distances for some reason you can generally use estuary rods up to around 8 or 9-foot in length for flathead estuary fishing.

The usual flathead baits and lures work just as well here. Prawns, baitfish even sand or beach worms.

Good spots are often where the estuary has sandy beaches. Cast out into the channels and gutters. The turning tide is an excellent time to try.

Dusk & Dawn, Top Times

The larger flathead specimens are more likely to move in closer to shore after dusk and before dawn.

Berley and attractant is a must when flathead estuary fishing. See the next section where I explain some of the reasons I always use these tools. Suffice to say for now this is what gets the fish in closer to where you are and helps create some interest.

Because estuaries are such changeable environments there are times when flathead estuary fishing is going to be better – or worse.

For example, during and after a flood there’s often murkier and fresher water in the estuary. The tide is going to wash less salty water into the system. That can result in fewer flathead in the river. Naturally, this depends on the estuary. It seems to be a bigger problem in the southern states than northern states.

Flathead Estuary Fishing Environmental Considerations

You need to also consider the environment itself. Pollution levels from chemical spills. How clogged up the estuary gets. Weeds and more importantly silt can block the flow of the system. Because of this, some estuaries can remain landlocked for part of the year.

The Powlett river at Kilcunda is a good example of this. I’ve never caught a single flathead there. Though I’ve caught small Australian salmon. The Powlett estuary is frequently obstructed by a sandbar. When it does run it often does so over an exposed rock shelf that limits the amount of tidal water that enters the area.


By Dave - from Getfished!

About

Dave spends most of his time split between fishing, working on Getfished and on boating and kayak fishing. After 30+ years as a programmer spending more time as a fisho has allowed him to grow his passion for the hobby. Running Getfished has meant Dave's been able to share some of the places he loves to fish at. As well as some of his favourite tackle and gear.